Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 25,388
Likes: 83
Legend
OP Offline
Legend
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 25,388
Likes: 83
Missouri man jailed for over 40 years exonerated; judge says he was wrongfully convicted in 3 killings

Kevin Strickland, 62, has always maintained that he was home watching television and had nothing to do with the 1978 killings.

By The Associated Press

A Kansas City man who has been jailed for more than 40 years for three murders was wrongfully convicted in 1979 and will be released, a Missouri judge ruled Tuesday.

Kevin Strickland, 62, has always maintained that he was home watching television and had nothing to do with the killings, which happened when he was 18 years old.

Judge James Welsh, a retired Missouri Court of Appeals judge, ruled after a three-day evidentiary hearing requested by a Jackson County prosecutor who said evidence used to convict Strickland had been recanted or disproven since his 1979 conviction.

Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt fought efforts led by Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker and other legal and political leaders to free Strickland. Schmitt, a Republican running for the U.S. Senate, said Strickland was guilty. Gov. Mike Parson declined Strickland’s clemency requests.

Strickland was convicted in the deaths of Larry Ingram, 21; John Walker, 20; and Sherrie Black, 22, at a home in Kansas City.

The evidentiary hearing focused largely on previous testimony from Cynthia Douglas, the only person to survive the April 25, 1978, shootings. She initially identified Strickland as one of four men who shot the victims and testified to that during his two trials.

But she later said she was pressured by police to choose Strickland and tried for years to alert political and legal experts to help her prove she had identified the wrong man, according to testimony during the hearing from her family, friends and a co-worker. Douglas died in 2015.

During the hearing, attorneys for the Missouri Attorney General’s office argued that Strickland’s advocates had not provided any kind of paper trail that proved Douglas tried to recant her identification of Strickland, saying the theory was based on “hearsay, upon hearsay, upon hearsay,”

Two other men convicted in the killings later insisted that Strickland wasn’t at the crime scene, The Kansas City Star reported. They named two other suspects, who were never charged.

During his testimony, Strickland denied suggestions that he offered Douglas $300 to “keep her mouth shut,” and said he had never visited the house where the murders occurred before they happened.

Strickland is Black, and his first trial ended in a hung jury when the only Black juror, a woman, held out for acquittal. After his second trial in 1979, he was convicted by an all-white jury of one count of capital murder and two counts of second-degree murder.

In May, Peters Baker announced that a review of the case led her to believe that Strickland was innocent.

In June, the Missouri Supreme Court declined to hear Strickland’s petition.

In August, Peters Baker used a new state law to seek the evidentiary hearing in Jackson County, where Strickland was convicted. The law allows local prosecutors to challenge convictions if they believe the defendant did not commit the crime. It was the first time — and so far the only time — that a prosecutor has used the law to fight a previous conviction.

The hearing was delayed several times by motions filed by Schmitt’s office, one of which successfully argued to have all judges in the 16th Circuit, which includes Jackson County, recused from the hearings, citing a letter in which the circuit’s presiding judge said he agreed Strickland should be exonerated. Welsh was then appointed to preside over the hearing.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-new...-judge-says-was-wrongfully-conv-rcna6501

We really do need a complete overhaul of the criminal justice system. Courts, Police, Prisons, Laws, and every type of person involved in any way, rather parole officer, probation officer, corrections officer, etc.; they all need to be trained better and screened better. There are just so few checks and balances in our system. We shouldn't make it easier on actual criminals, but we should and can do better.


No really, I care about your feelings. rolleyes

#gmstrong

Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 33,890
Likes: 60
B
Legend
Offline
Legend
B
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 33,890
Likes: 60
We don't need a complete overhaul. Our system is as good as it get's.

Overhaul to what? I'd bet more guilty people are deemed not guilty because of lack of evidence and let go than the mistakes made like this example. If you are seeking a perfect system, it doesn't exist.

I do think that young offenders should never be given life without parole. Maybe anybody. Everybody should be given consideration after some period of time. maybe 20 years? 25? I am not saying they should be released as a blanket statement, but people do change and mature over 25 years no matter their age. If we are going to call it a corrections system, then we need to allow for corrections to be made.

No doubt we don't release and forget. A long parole period, maybe a lifetime, needs to be in place. In conjunction with that, we have to do better in our efforts to allow ex-cons to succeed after release. If they are released and run in to roadblock after roadblock in any effort to make it back in to civilized society it's little wonder they revert back to crime.

It isn't the justice system that needs reform. It's what we do with these people after they get caught in the suck of the system. Some people get in the system and make no effort to reform. Many try but the suck keeps them heading down the drain.

We can talk about that as there is much to talk about. To simply say the system needs to change is pointless because there is no better way to do it. We tend to forget, innocent until proven guilty and judged by citizens of the community, at least unless you opt for a bench trial and allow the judge to make the determination of guilty or innocent, which in some cases might be wise for more people to select.

People always need hope. If there is no hope for release, then there is no reason to try to improve.

Last edited by Ballpeen; 11/24/21 06:18 AM.

If everybody had like minds, we would never learn.

GM Strong




[Linked Image]
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,545
Likes: 14
P
Hall of Famer
Offline
Hall of Famer
P
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,545
Likes: 14
Cops need better and more training. Period. You can’t tell me these people can learn the laws they’re out there to uphold in a few months of training. Especially because many aren’t exactly the cream of the crop intelligence wise. With that there should be a higher standard of baseline intelligence for entry. I’d prefer my gun toting, badge wearers not be the idiot ex jock types I went to high school with that struggled to pass basic social studies. Therefore they never had to take higher level government/civic classes. If you can’t pull a 2.8 GPA or higher in high school we shouldn’t be offering you a chance to open carry and enforce laws.
My guess is most on the force struggled to maintain a C average.


[Linked Image]
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 9,777
Likes: 58
O
Hall of Famer
Offline
Hall of Famer
O
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 9,777
Likes: 58
I don't know about a complete overhaul, but some of the stuff in that article reeks of zero accountability. I get prosecutors have a tough job and they need thick skin and some amount of coverage from the public, but they are also dealing with people's lives, and the simple fact is sometimes people get it wrong. I have no problem with them occasionally getting it wrong... it's an unfortunate fact that that will happen... but this drawn out process to right a wrong simply because (I assume) a lawyer doesn't want his W/L knocked down a peg is terrible.


There is no level of sucking we haven't seen; in fact, I'm pretty sure we hold the patents on a few levels of sucking NOBODY had seen until the past few years.

-PrplPplEater
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 50,252
Likes: 73
P
Legend
Offline
Legend
P
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 50,252
Likes: 73
There are certainly tweaks to the system that could be addressed. I think first and foremost is that prosecutors should not be elected officials as they are in most state and local jurisdictions. It gives them every motivation to get a conviction even if they find out they were wrong. It gives them the motivation to charge people with crimes they know overstep the actual infraction in order to get them to plea deal down which shows as a conviction. Their conviction rate is all important in being re-elected and admitting they made a mistake certainly won't play well at election time.

It would be nice to expect the police to be better informed and educated in terms of the law. However, you can't expect people to get paid what cops get paid and then expect some super high standard from them. If you want better, more accountable police, then you would certainly have to up the pay. I do feel however making them more accountable for bad behavior on the part of law enforcement would be a good idea. I also think a national data base to stop bad cops from becoming a cop somewhere else would be important.

So I guess I fall somewhere in the middle. I doubt Peen and I would agree on the tweaks that need to be made, but to the extent between a complete overhaul and tweaks to the system, I'd say I come closer to siding with him.


Stand up for those less fortunate than yourself. That's what Jesus told us to do.

#gmstrong
1 member likes this: FATE
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,545
Likes: 14
P
Hall of Famer
Offline
Hall of Famer
P
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,545
Likes: 14
As to the pay to education level… as a nurse you have to have anywhere from two to four years of education, minimally. Pay falls somewhere between $55,000 to $80,000+ depending on your specialty.

The duration of the training in the Police Academy varies for the different agencies. It usually takes about 13 to 19 weeks on average but can last up to six months.

California average police officer salary: $105,220
Alaska average police officer salary: $87,870
New Jersey average police officer salary: $86,840
Washington average police officer salary: $80,200
Hawaii average police officer salary: $78,720
Illinois average police officer salary: $78,350
New York average police officer salary: $77,490
Colorado average police officer salary: $75,720
Delaware average police officer salary: $73,740
Nevada average police officer salary: $73,660

https://www.forbes.com/sites/andrewdepietro/2020/04/23/police-officer-salary-state/amp/


Time for a better educated police force. Period.

(I’ve been punched, pinched, spit on, scratched, had food and body fluids thrown at me, etc… I don’t get to fight back or pull a gun. Just for some perspective about similar job difficulties or things seen and endured while on the clock.)

Last edited by PortlandDawg; 11/24/21 11:49 AM.

[Linked Image]
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 33,890
Likes: 60
B
Legend
Offline
Legend
B
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 33,890
Likes: 60
Originally Posted by PitDAWG
There are certainly tweaks to the system that could be addressed. I think first and foremost is that prosecutors should not be elected officials as they are in most state and local jurisdictions. It gives them every motivation to get a conviction even if they find out they were wrong. It gives them the motivation to charge people with crimes they know overstep the actual infraction in order to get them to plea deal down which shows as a conviction. Their conviction rate is all important in being re-elected and admitting they made a mistake certainly won't play well at election time.

It would be nice to expect the police to be better informed and educated in terms of the law. However, you can't expect people to get paid what cops get paid and then expect some super high standard from them. If you want better, more accountable police, then you would certainly have to up the pay. I do feel however making them more accountable for bad behavior on the part of law enforcement would be a good idea. I also think a national data base to stop bad cops from becoming a cop somewhere else would be important.

So I guess I fall somewhere in the middle. I doubt Peen and I would agree on the tweaks that need to be made, but to the extent between a complete overhaul and tweaks to the system, I'd say I come closer to siding with him.


Actually, we agree on many of your points. A bad cop in town A is probably going to be a bad cop in town B. To allow them to pinball around makes no sense. I agree, if a person has demonstrated they don't have the temperament to be a good public servant, they shouldn't be allowed. We might disagree on what is over the line and what isn't, but that's another story, but no doubt some people shouldn't be a cop any more than some people shouldn't be a nurse.

A slight correct in that prosecutors are usually appointed or hired positions. The DA is the elected position. I don't know if that is a bad thing. For as many people who want to see criminals locked up, you have just as many or more who want to see fair justice served. I don't think many people out there like stories like this one where a guy is locked up for 40 years even though he as innocent.

We do need to remember these stories make the news because they are so horrible. When you sit down and count how many there are, it is a very small percentage...like very small. Like I said, there is no way to get it 100% perfect. Sometimes mistakes are made and sometimes all the evidence points in one direction and most reasonable people see it as the truth when in fact it isn't. I just don't know how you can prevent that.

As for piling on charges, I agree, that is a problem. The FEDs are big in to that. Except for some high profile cases, they hardly ever go to trial. Plead guilty and out in 7 years, go to trial and be found guilty you get 25 years. It's almost like they are daring you to not take the plea. Even if you are innocent, that is a big gamble to take.


If everybody had like minds, we would never learn.

GM Strong




[Linked Image]
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 25,428
Likes: 35
Legend
Offline
Legend
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 25,428
Likes: 35
Cops will never be the creme of the crop when you pay them half as much as they could earn at other jobs.


I AM ALWAYS RIGHT... except when I am wrong.
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,545
Likes: 14
P
Hall of Famer
Offline
Hall of Famer
P
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,545
Likes: 14
Half as much? Where are you getting a job paying twice as much as the salaries I listed above, with government benefits/pension, with only 13-16 months to maybe 6 months of training? Especially when you’re not the cream of the intelligence crop. Maybe long haul trucking will pay as well or a little better… I think you can get a CDL fairly quickly. But twice as much?


[Linked Image]
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 33,890
Likes: 60
B
Legend
Offline
Legend
B
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 33,890
Likes: 60
Originally Posted by PortlandDawg
As to the pay to education level… as a nurse you have to have anywhere from two to four years of education, minimally. Pay falls somewhere between $55,000 to $80,000+ depending on your specialty.

The duration of the training in the Police Academy varies for the different agencies. It usually takes about 13 to 19 weeks on average but can last up to six months.

California average police officer salary: $105,220
Alaska average police officer salary: $87,870
New Jersey average police officer salary: $86,840
Washington average police officer salary: $80,200
Hawaii average police officer salary: $78,720
Illinois average police officer salary: $78,350
New York average police officer salary: $77,490
Colorado average police officer salary: $75,720
Delaware average police officer salary: $73,740
Nevada average police officer salary: $73,660

https://www.forbes.com/sites/andrewdepietro/2020/04/23/police-officer-salary-state/amp/


Time for a better educated police force. Period.

(I’ve been punched, pinched, spit on, scratched, had food and body fluids thrown at me, etc… I don’t get to fight back or pull a gun. Just for some perspective about similar job difficulties or things seen and endured while on the clock.)

I think you are placing too much emphasis on education. Don't get me wrong, I am all for being educated, but being educated doesn't always indicate intelligence, nor does it always mean more pay. I am not sure what your beef is other than you don't really care all that much for the police.

You are living in the perfect place.


If everybody had like minds, we would never learn.

GM Strong




[Linked Image]
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 10,359
Likes: 25
Legend
Offline
Legend
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 10,359
Likes: 25
Originally Posted by PortlandDawg
As to the pay to education level… as a nurse you have to have anywhere from two to four years of education, minimally. Pay falls somewhere between $55,000 to $80,000+ depending on your specialty.

The duration of the training in the Police Academy varies for the different agencies. It usually takes about 13 to 19 weeks on average but can last up to six months.

California average police officer salary: $105,220
Alaska average police officer salary: $87,870
New Jersey average police officer salary: $86,840
Washington average police officer salary: $80,200
Hawaii average police officer salary: $78,720
Illinois average police officer salary: $78,350
New York average police officer salary: $77,490
Colorado average police officer salary: $75,720
Delaware average police officer salary: $73,740
Nevada average police officer salary: $73,660

https://www.forbes.com/sites/andrewdepietro/2020/04/23/police-officer-salary-state/amp/


Time for a better educated police force. Period.

(I’ve been punched, pinched, spit on, scratched, had food and body fluids thrown at me, etc… I don’t get to fight back or pull a gun. Just for some perspective about similar job difficulties or things seen and endured while on the clock.)

Here’s a look at the bottom-10 states for police officer salaries:

Mississippi average police officer salary: $36,290
Arkansas average police officer salary: $40,570
Louisiana average police officer salary: $42,470
South Carolina average police officer salary: $43,520
West Virginia average police officer salary: $44,450
Georgia average police officer salary: $44,700
Tennessee average police officer salary: $45,370
Alabama average police officer salary: $46,510
Kentucky average police officer salary: $46,720
North Carolina average police officer salary: $47,340

Average pay is roughly $67000.
I


#gmstrong
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 5,242
Likes: 13
Hall of Famer
Offline
Hall of Famer
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 5,242
Likes: 13
Those are misleading stats, as to be realistic, the cost of living would have to be the same in all locations.

The cost of living is not the same across the United States.

It is the relative cost to the location that we are considering.


Everything will be alright in the end. If things are not alright, it must not be the end.

1 member likes this: EveDawg
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 13,468
Likes: 85
Legend
Offline
Legend
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 13,468
Likes: 85
Quote
I think you are placing too much emphasis on education. Don't get me wrong, I am all for being educated, but being educated doesn't always indicate intelligence, nor does it always mean more pay.

I think I know and understand the point he's making, and it isn't so much about education as it is time of quality training for the given craft/specialty in question. It has been his premise all along- and I don't disagree. In fact, his 'numbers list post' was in support of his original premise. I was able to follow his train of thought, and understood not only both posts, but their relationship to each other. I'm pretty sure you could, too. And just in case you couldn't... well lucky for you, I just provided you with a "follow-the-dots" map to get you caught up. You now have no excuse to not meet us on this field of play.

Let's stay on message here, shall we?

His point is valid.


24 is the new 32
1 member likes this: PortlandDawg
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 33,890
Likes: 60
B
Legend
Offline
Legend
B
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 33,890
Likes: 60
I follow along just fine and understand your point. My issue is when he started to talk about police aren't very high on the intelligence quotient and being paid what they are paid. It sounded like he was complaining because he is a nurse and feels underpaid.

I am not sure that poor police work is because of a lack of training as much as it is not having the personality to work with the public. I agree that some have what I call a cowboy mentality and just get off wearing a badge and carrying a weapon. There is way more to the job than pulling people over for some reason and acting like a big shot.

Trust me, I have no problem with training and have no problem weakening the police union some when it comes to weeding out unfit cops. I don't want them on the force any more than you do.

A quick check shows the average police academy runs 13-19 weeks. Some 6 months. I can see funding increases to push all up to the 6 month timeframe. Officers also undergo post hire training. They don't get out of academy and start patrolling the streets alone. At least here they don't.


If everybody had like minds, we would never learn.

GM Strong




[Linked Image]
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,545
Likes: 14
P
Hall of Famer
Offline
Hall of Famer
P
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,545
Likes: 14
It has nothing to do with my pay. I feel well compensated for the work I do and the education level I have. I do not feel like I could have gotten up to speed to do my job in 13-16 weeks. What I do is too complex to grasp with such little time.

There’s no way in hell a cop can understand the laws they’re employed to enforce in 13-16 weeks. You argued that they don’t get paid enough to recruit the best and brightest. I showed you they do get paid well enough. Especially for the little training they require. I feel they need more, better, harder training. This will help weed out some of the low IQ testosterone cowboy types.


[Linked Image]
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,545
Likes: 14
P
Hall of Famer
Offline
Hall of Famer
P
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,545
Likes: 14
Originally Posted by Pdawg
Originally Posted by PortlandDawg
As to the pay to education level… as a nurse you have to have anywhere from two to four years of education, minimally. Pay falls somewhere between $55,000 to $80,000+ depending on your specialty.

The duration of the training in the Police Academy varies for the different agencies. It usually takes about 13 to 19 weeks on average but can last up to six months.

California average police officer salary: $105,220
Alaska average police officer salary: $87,870
New Jersey average police officer salary: $86,840
Washington average police officer salary: $80,200
Hawaii average police officer salary: $78,720
Illinois average police officer salary: $78,350
New York average police officer salary: $77,490
Colorado average police officer salary: $75,720
Delaware average police officer salary: $73,740
Nevada average police officer salary: $73,660

https://www.forbes.com/sites/andrewdepietro/2020/04/23/police-officer-salary-state/amp/


Time for a better educated police force. Period.

(I’ve been punched, pinched, spit on, scratched, had food and body fluids thrown at me, etc… I don’t get to fight back or pull a gun. Just for some perspective about similar job difficulties or things seen and endured while on the clock.)

Here’s a look at the bottom-10 states for police officer salaries:

Mississippi average police officer salary: $36,290
Arkansas average police officer salary: $40,570
Louisiana average police officer salary: $42,470
South Carolina average police officer salary: $43,520
West Virginia average police officer salary: $44,450
Georgia average police officer salary: $44,700
Tennessee average police officer salary: $45,370
Alabama average police officer salary: $46,510
Kentucky average police officer salary: $46,720
North Carolina average police officer salary: $47,340

Average pay is roughly $67000.
I


My sisters both have the same level of education as I do. Both live in Ohio. Neither makes nearly what I make. My little sister is lucky to break $40,000 a year. My older sister, working with mentally and physically disabled children, she’s lucky to make $30,000.
So yes, pay scales can vary. (Though my older sister is GROSSLY underpaid. Big heart/small paycheck.)
$46,000 for a cop in Alabama goes a lot further than the same money in California.
Cops are well benefitted too. Full pensions at retirement. Etc. My older sister is uninsured. There is no retirement pension.

Cops are well compensated. It’s time their training reflects their duties and pay more closely.


[Linked Image]
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 50,252
Likes: 73
P
Legend
Offline
Legend
P
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 50,252
Likes: 73
I certainly agree with you in regards to training. But as was stated, you did use the highest paying parts of the nation to make your point of police pay and compensation. There are a lot of cities and small towns where cops aren't paid well and I can't think of any other job where dodging bullets is a part of the job description. I'm guessing you would have to give people some pretty good incentives for that.


Stand up for those less fortunate than yourself. That's what Jesus told us to do.

#gmstrong
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 33,890
Likes: 60
B
Legend
Offline
Legend
B
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 33,890
Likes: 60
Originally Posted by PortlandDawg
It has nothing to do with my pay. I feel well compensated for the work I do and the education level I have. I do not feel like I could have gotten up to speed to do my job in 13-16 weeks. What I do is too complex to grasp with such little time.

There’s no way in hell a cop can understand the laws they’re employed to enforce in 13-16 weeks. You argued that they don’t get paid enough to recruit the best and brightest. I showed you they do get paid well enough. Especially for the little training they require. I feel they need more, better, harder training. This will help weed out some of the low IQ testosterone cowboy types.

I don't think I argued they didn't get paid enough.


If everybody had like minds, we would never learn.

GM Strong




[Linked Image]
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 9,777
Likes: 58
O
Hall of Famer
Offline
Hall of Famer
O
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 9,777
Likes: 58
I question those numbers. My sister is an Orange County (CA) sheriff and she doesn't make anywhere near $100k. I know, data point of 1... but if the population is skewed older, that'll push the average salary up.


There is no level of sucking we haven't seen; in fact, I'm pretty sure we hold the patents on a few levels of sucking NOBODY had seen until the past few years.

-PrplPplEater
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 10,359
Likes: 25
Legend
Offline
Legend
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 10,359
Likes: 25
Originally Posted by oobernoober
I question those numbers. My sister is an Orange County (CA) sheriff and she doesn't make anywhere near $100k. I know, data point of 1... but if the population is skewed older, that'll push the average salary up.

I think these wages include overtime worked as well. The average is only 67 k. That Isn't all that much if you are including overtime . Many police have degrees since it is needed in many jurisdictions to get promoted. I don't think it is necessary for all police to have degrees. I am not opposed to having a longer Academy for all officers. I would also raise starting wages . I live in a small town here in Ohio and starting wages are very low. I would love to hear Devil's opinion as well as other police about their training


#gmstrong
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 25,428
Likes: 35
Legend
Offline
Legend
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 25,428
Likes: 35
After reading Portlands response to me I went and looked up some info and also talked with a few friends who are cops last night. Starting wage in this area for cops is around 30 to 35 K per year. It looks like many of the places do not require more than a High School education. Benefits vary, the larger the area the higher the pay. Some small towns around here actually have starting saleries in the low 20 K range, and officers have to pay for their own equipment (I.E.) uniforms, dry cleaning, shoes, hats, in some cases even their bullet proof vest. Hell you can work at a fast food joint around here and make 12 bucks an hour to start which is just a hair under 25K per year.


I AM ALWAYS RIGHT... except when I am wrong.
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 4,832
Likes: 80
Hall of Famer
Offline
Hall of Famer
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 4,832
Likes: 80
My son was about to enroll in the academy after he got his degree in 2016. Starting pay in his area was about 32-38K. That was when the ACAB culture started taking hold. That rhetoric is disgusting. His mom was scared to death. As a family, we talked him out of it.

He's a chemist now, chemists come home at night. They don't get spit on and shamed in the street just for their job title. They don't get lumped together and treated like scumbags for meager pay. They don't get psychologically scarred while doing their job. ACABO - all chemists are better off...

Sad, because he is a great person with nothing but love in his heart and a desire to actually serve and protect. You can still see regret in his eyes when we talk about it. He was that kid that said "I want to be a policeman" and meant it.


HERE WE GO BROWNIES! HERE WE GO!!
DawgTalkers.net Forums DawgTalk Palus Politicus Exonerated after 40 years, wrongfully convicted

Link Copied to Clipboard
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5