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#1746378 - 03/25/20 01:24 AM Re: Covid-19 contin [Re: Milk Man]
Milk Man Offline

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Registered: 11/01/08
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#1746437 - 03/25/20 11:52 AM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: PerfectSpiral]
PitDAWG Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/10/06
Posts: 39773
Loc: Smyrna, TN.
Bill Gates says we can’t restart the economy soon and simply “ignore that pile of bodies over in the corner”

Gates rebuked the proposal of leaders like Donald Trump.

Bill Gates rebuked proposals, floated over the last two days by leaders like Donald Trump, to reopen the global economy despite the Covid-19 coronavirus outbreak, saying that this approach would be “very irresponsible.”

Gates did not mention Trump by name, but the American president has said that he may decide to relax some of the country’s “social distancing” in order to jumpstart the country’s shut-down economy. Gates, the country’s leading philanthropist, has been among the most active tech leaders in using his resources to try and contain the virus.

“There really is no middle ground, and it’s very tough to say to people, ‘Hey, keep going to restaurants, go buy new houses, ignore that pile of bodies over in the corner. We want you to keep spending because there’s maybe a politician who thinks GDP growth is all that counts,’” Gates said in an interview with TED Tuesday. “It’s very irresponsible for somebody to suggest that we can have the best of both worlds.”

Trump has suggested that this middle ground would indeed be possible — by letting some healthy people return to work, for instance, while keeping more vulnerable workers in their homes. Experts have said that drastic and widespread social distancing is required to keep the pandemic from spreading further. Trump has said he would make a decision at the end of the month but has said that he believes the “cure” could be worse than the “problem itself.”

Asked what he would do if he were president, Gates returned to his concerns about reopening the economy.

“The economic effect of this is really dramatic. Nothing like this has ever happened to the economy in our lifetimes,” Gates said. “But bringing the economy back ... that’s more of a reversible thing than bringing people back to life. So we’re going to take the pain in the economic dimension — huge pain — in order to minimize the pain in the diseases-and-death dimension.”

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has put up $100 million for programs to fund testing and science around the pandemic, and he has begun using his public profile, too, to shape the coronavirus conversation. This month, Gates himself resigned from the board of Microsoft, which he founded, and is now effectively a full-time philanthropist — and the country’s most famous one.

And Gates has tried to cast himself as an optimist. He has said that the social distancing measures might need to last as little as six weeks, but said that “we have no choice,” despite the economic impacts.

“It’s disastrous for the economy,” Gates said. But “the sooner you do it in a tough way, the sooner you can undo it and go back to normal.”

https://www.vox.com/recode/2020/3/24/211...iSjGPBoYbfNi32o

Another one of those evil one percenters.
_________________________
Sashi Brown was so bad at his job in Cleveland, no other NFL team would even offer him a job. He has been relegated to being in charge of "the culture" of an NBA team. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

#gmstrong

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#1746458 - 03/25/20 12:53 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: Milk Man]
PrplPplEater Offline

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Registered: 09/10/06
Posts: 22795
Loc: Cleveland, Ohio
I'm afraid to see just how much utterly useless and pointless crap was stuffed into this thing.
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Fear us, for we have Hughlett

... there goes Joe Thomas, the best there ever was in this game.


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#1746463 - 03/25/20 01:02 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: PerfectSpiral]
PitDAWG Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/10/06
Posts: 39773
Loc: Smyrna, TN.
Pastor again defies state order not to hold large gatherings. He says 1,000 people came to his church Sunday

Remember the Louisiana pastor who defied the governor's order not to hold gatherings larger than 50 people?
He held services again on Sunday, and he plans to do so yet again on Tuesday night.

On Sunday, Pastor Tony Spell said, his Life Tabernacle Church in Baton Rouge drew about 1,000 people to its services, in part by busing people in from across five parishes.

On Tuesday evening, the pastor plans to hold services again, despite the governor's stay-at-home orders, a petition seeking his arrest and a flood of criticism from fellow Christians.

"If they close every door in this city, then I will close my doors," Spell told CNN on Tuesday. "But you can't say the retailers are essential but the church is not. That is a persecution of the faith."

Spell has told CNN he believes the pandemic is "politically motivated."

Chief Roger Corcoran of the Central Police Department in Baton Rouge told CNN that the "matter is under investigation."

Corcoran also disputed Spell's claim last week that the police department told the pastor that the National Guard would be brought in to disperse the church assembly.

"That was never told to the pastor by my officer," Corcoran said.
Spell stands by his account. A spokesman for the Louisiana National Guard said they have not been tasked with breaking up large gatherings.

The pastor says he's heard from the White House

As the novel coronavirus spreads across the world, nearly every faith group has closed its holy sites and houses of worship. But there remain a defiant few pastors and religious leaders who refuse to close their doors, accusing the government of overreach and imposing on their religious freedom.

Earlier in March, Lousiana Governor John Bel Edwards issued an emergency order barring gatherings of larger than 50 people to stop the spread of Covid-19.

On Sunday, Edwards went even further, asking residents statewide to only leave home for essential needs like shopping for food, going to the pharmacy or caring for a family member.

Louisiana has the fastest growth rate of coronavirus cases in the world, Edwards said during a news conference on Sunday, citing a University of Louisiana Lafayette study.

The governor's office did not respond to repeated requests from CNN for comment about Spell's church services. On Sunday, Edwards told CNN affiliate WVLA that he would "would urge that faith leaders and all faith leaders to heed this directive and not necessarily engage in mass gatherings where this coronavirus can spread."

For his part, Spell said he is following social distancing guidelines, including instructions from Washington. The pastor said someone from the White House -- he declined to say who -- called him last week.

The official, according to Spell, asked him to hold services outside, make his congregation stand six feet apart and prevent non-family members from touching.

According to the Washington Post, Spell spoke with Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council and a member of President Trump's informal body of evangelical advisers. A spokesman for Perkins said the conversation took place but that Perkins was not immediately available for comment.
In a statement, the White House said, "During this public health crisis, the Trump Administration has been extremely proactive in reaching out to leaders from the faith community, hosting several calls last week with more than 1,200 inter-faith leaders.

"The White House has strongly recommended that all Americans, including pastors, follow CDC guidelines by limiting groups to 10 people and practicing social distancing. President Trump encourages Americans of all religious backgrounds to do their part to stay healthy and stop the spread."

Despite criticism, Spell remains undeterred

A video of the Sunday service, posted on Spell's Facebook page, shows his congregation singing, praying, touching and otherwise worshiping in close proximity, mostly under a tent. The 1,000 congregants were spread across the church's seven buildings, Spell said.

The pastor said he's heard a flood of criticism from fellow Christians urging him to close his doors. Many, Spell said, cite Romans 13, the passage in which the Apostle Paul urges Christians to submit to "governing authorities." Others ask him to consider the greater good.

On Monday, the influential evangelical magazine Christianity Today published an editorial asking pastors and church leaders to consider the consequences of their actions.

"We are being asked temporarily to convene remotely, not to deny our faith or to cease worshiping God," said the editorial, which was co-written with Walter Kim, president of the National Association of Evangelicals.

"It is one thing to risk your own life in order to worship together in person," the editorial continued, "it is quite another to risk the lives of countless others, when so many churches are finding creative and compelling ways to carry on in worship and community from a distance."
An online petition from "The People of Greater Baton Rouge" asks that Spell be arrested and charged with reckless endangerment.
Spell, though, remains undeterred.

The pastor told CNN that people been cured of HIV-AIDS and cancer at his worship services, which feature faith-healing, speaking in tongues and other spiritual hallmarks of Pentecostalism.

Asked what he would do if a member of his congregation contracted coronavirus, Spell shifted the blame.
"Did they contract it at Walmart or Target?" he asked. "They have more people in their parking lot than we get here in a week."

https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/24/us/louisiana-pastor-spell-coronavirus/index.html
_________________________
Sashi Brown was so bad at his job in Cleveland, no other NFL team would even offer him a job. He has been relegated to being in charge of "the culture" of an NBA team. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

#gmstrong

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#1746474 - 03/25/20 01:19 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: PerfectSpiral]
PitDAWG Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/10/06
Posts: 39773
Loc: Smyrna, TN.
'Imaginary clock': Governors reject Trump's virus timeline

AUSTIN, TEXAS —

Governors across the nation on Tuesday rejected President Donald Trump's new accelerated timeline for reopening the U.S. economy, as they continued to impose more restrictions on travel and public life in an attempt to curb the spread of the coronavirus.

The dismissal of Trump's mid-April timeframe for a national reopening came from Republicans and Democrats, from leaders struggling to manage hot spots of the outbreak and those still bracing for the worst. Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, the head of the National Governors Association and a Republican, called the messaging confusing since most leaders are still focused on enforcing the restrictions, not easing them. He accused the White House of running on a schedule made of some “imaginary clock.”

The pushback suggests Trump's talk of an early reboot is unlikely to gain traction. In most cases, it's state leaders — not the federal government — who are responsible for both imposing and lifting the stay-at-home orders and other restrictions intended to stop the contagion.

But the governors' reaction also revealed the striking disconnect and growing tensions between Trump and the state leaders closer to the front lines of a crisis that threatens to overwhelm U.S. hospitals and claim thousands of lives.

The president is eager to get the U.S. back to work as the crisis takes a political toll and the economy, which had been the cornerstone of his re-election bid, begins to wobble. The economic damage could be worse than the death toll from the virus, he has said. As soon as next week, Trump wants to take another look at recommendations about business closures and self-isolation, and said Tuesday the country could reopen by Easter Sunday — less than a month away. “Our people want to return to work," he said.

But governors suggested that view had little connection to the reality they're facing. California Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom said he and Trump are “clearly operating under a different set of assumptions." California, home to 40 million people and the world’s fifth-largest economy, reported hundreds of new known cases of COVID 19 and now has more than 2,200, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University.

In New York, Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Tuesday said the infection rate was doubling every three days and pleaded for more federal help as the number of cases in the state surpassed 20,000.

“If you ask the American people to choose between public health and the economy, then it's no contest. No American is going to say accelerate the economy at the cost of human life," Cuomo told reporters Tuesday. "Job one has to be save lives. That has to be the priority.”

Even some of Trump’s usual allies are continuing to move ahead with tighter controls on travel, commerce and mobility, despite the president's words. In Texas, Republican Gov. Greg Abbott has endorsed stay-at-home orders that continued to spread through the biggest cities. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey said public health needed to come first, and South Dakota Gov. Krisiti Noem is stressing limiting business activity, not relaxing them.

“This situation is not going to be over in a week," said Noem, whose state has more than two dozen cases. “We have another eight weeks until we see our peak infection rate."

The U.S. is now more than a week into an unprecedented effort to encourage all Americans to drastically scale back their public activities. The orders closing schools, restaurants and businesses have largely come from a patchwork of local and state governments — with areas hit hardest imposing the most restrictions, while other communities are still weighing tighter rules.

That means the White House is eyeing ways to ease the advisories while some areas are still ramping up their responses — a mixed message that some governors worried would lead Americans to ignore the orders of local officials.

Michigan's Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat, told WWMT-TV/Sinclair Broadcast Group that Trump's “off-the-cuff statements are really going to undermine our ability to protect people.” Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker said Trump was “not taking into account the true damage that this will do to our country if we see truly millions of people die."

Trump has defended his handling of the outbreak and argued that his administration is doing all it can to help governors.

“They shouldn't be hitting us," he said on Fox News. “The fact is we've done a lot.”

Among the few statehouse leaders to publicly endorse Trump's view was Texas' lieutenant governor, Dan Patrick, 69, who on Monday suggested that people his age and older can “take care of ourselves " as the nation gets back to work. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says people over 65 are at higher risk for the disease.

Friction between Trump and the governors has been steady throughout the crisis. The president said last week that states should be doing more to obtain their own critically needed supplies while insisting that the federal government was not a shipping clerk. States, meanwhile, have been pressing the government to help procure necessary protective and breathing equipment.

On Tuesday, Trump suggested any shortage of ventilators was on the states.

“All they had to do was order them two years ago, but they decided not to do it. They can’t blame us for that,” he said on Fox News.

"Some of the messaging coming out of the administration doesn't match," Hogan, the Maryland governor, told CNN. “We don't think that we're going to be in any way ready to be out of this in five or six days or so, or whenever this 15 days is up from the time that they started this imaginary clock.”

For most people, the coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia. Worldwide, more than 375,000 cases have been reported, and while most people recover in weeks, more than 16,000 have died from the virus.

https://www.daytondailynews.com/news/nat...FfHwfw7Y87Fnngg
_________________________
Sashi Brown was so bad at his job in Cleveland, no other NFL team would even offer him a job. He has been relegated to being in charge of "the culture" of an NBA team. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

#gmstrong

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#1746478 - 03/25/20 01:32 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: PitDAWG]
PerfectSpiral Offline

Legend

Registered: 03/12/13
Posts: 10403
Realistically only if test kits could be processed by us in our homes and sent to us for a few weeks for retesting each week. It’ seems hopeless now. Everyone is going to catch the trump virus sooner or later. It’s way too late. Our leadership failed us and they’re just running damage control now.
_________________________
“The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.” Thomas Jefferson


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#1746484 - 03/25/20 01:37 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: PitDAWG]
mgh888 Offline

Hall of Famer

Registered: 03/15/13
Posts: 5673
Originally Posted By: PitDAWG
'Imaginary clock': Governors reject Trump's virus timeline

AUSTIN, TEXAS —

Governors across the nation on Tuesday rejected President Donald Trump's new accelerated timeline for reopening the U.S. economy, as they continued to impose more restrictions on travel and public life in an attempt to curb the spread of the coronavirus.

They are part of the hate group and Deep State that plague our nation.

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#1746486 - 03/25/20 01:38 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: mgh888]
PitDAWG Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/10/06
Posts: 39773
Loc: Smyrna, TN.
Even the Republican governors. wink
_________________________
Sashi Brown was so bad at his job in Cleveland, no other NFL team would even offer him a job. He has been relegated to being in charge of "the culture" of an NBA team. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

#gmstrong

Top
#1746504 - 03/25/20 02:15 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: PitDAWG]
mgh888 Offline

Hall of Famer

Registered: 03/15/13
Posts: 5673
j/c - what the neutral world sees:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-52012049

There are no fresh flowers at the 9/11 Memorial any more. An American altar usually decorated with roses, carnations and postcard-sized Stars and Stripes is sequestered behind a makeshift plastic railing. Broadway, the "Great White Way", is dark. The subway system is a ghost train. Staten Island ferries keep cutting through the choppy waters of New York harbour, passing Lady Liberty on the way in and out of Lower Manhattan, but hardly any passengers are on board. Times Square, normally such a roiling mass, is almost devoid of people.

In the midst of this planetary pandemic, nobody wants to meet any more at the "Crossroads of the World". A city known for its infectious energy, a city that likes to boast it never even has to sleep, has been forced into hibernation. With more cases than any other American conurbation, this city is once again Ground Zero, a term no New Yorker ever wanted applied here again. With manic suddenness, our world has been turned upside down, just as it was on September 11th.

Nations, like individuals, reveal themselves at times of crisis. In emergencies of this immense magnitude, it soon becomes evident whether a sitting president is equal to the moment. So what have we learnt about the United States as it confronts this national and global catastrophe? Will lawmakers on Capitol Hill, who have been in a form of legislative lockdown for years now, a paralysis borne of partisanship, rise to the challenge? And what of the man who now sits behind the Resolute Desk in the Oval Office, who has cloaked himself in the mantle of "wartime president"?

Of the three questions, the last one is the least interesting, largely because Donald Trump's response has been so predictable. He has not changed. He has not grown. He has not admitted errors. He has shown little humility.

Instead, all the hallmarks of his presidency have been on agitated display. The ridiculous boasts - he has awarded himself a 10 out of 10 for his handling of the crisis. The politicisation of what should be the apolitical - he toured the Centers for Disease Control wearing a campaign cap emblazoned with the slogan "Keep America Great".

The mind-bending truth-twisting - he now claims to have fully appreciated the scale of the pandemic early on, despite dismissing and downplaying the threat for weeks. The attacks on the "fake news" media, including a particularly vicious assault on a White House reporter who asked what was his message to frightened Americans: "I tell them you are a terrible reporter." His pettiness and peevishness - mocking Senator Mitt Romney, the only Republican who voted at the end of the impeachment trial for his removal from office, for going into isolation.



His continued attacks on government institutions in the forefront of confronting the crisis - "the Deep State Department" is how he described the State Department from his presidential podium the morning after it issued its most extreme travel advisory urging Americans to refrain from all international travel. His obsession with ratings, or in this instance, confirmed case numbers - he stopped a cruise ship docking on the West Coast, noting: "I like the numbers where they are. I don't need to have the numbers double because of one ship that wasn't our fault." His compulsion for hype - declaring the combination of hydroxycholoroquine and azithromycin "one of the biggest game-changers in the history of medicine," even as medical officials warn against offering false hope.

His lack of empathy. Rather than soothing words for relatives of those who have died, or words of encouragement and appreciation for those in the medical trenches, Trump's daily White House briefings commonly start with a shower of self-congratulation. After Trump has spoken, Mike Pence, his loyal deputy, usually delivers a paean of praise to the president in that Pyongyang-on-the-Potomac style he has perfected over the past three years. Trump's narcissistic hunger for adoration seems impossible to sate. Instead of a wartime president, he has sounded at times like a sun king.

Then there is the xenophobia that has always been the sine qua non of his political business model - repeatedly he describes the disease as the "Chinese virus". Just as he scapegoated China and Mexican immigrants for decimating America's industrial heartland ahead of the 2016 presidential election, he is blaming Beijing for the coronavirus outbreak in an attempt to win re-election.

Trump and the 'Chinese virus'
Why Trump is cooling on lockdown strategy
His attempt at economic stewardship has been more convincing than his mastery of public health. A lesson from financial shocks of the past, most notably the meltdown in 2008, is to "go big" early on. That he has tried to do. But here, as well, there are shades of his showman self. He seems to have rounded on the initial figure of a trillion dollars for the stimulus package because it sounds like such a gargantuan number - a fiscal eighth wonder of the world.

Trump, in common with all populists and demagogues, favours simple solutions to complex problems. He closed America's border to those who had travelled to China, a sensible move in hindsight. However, the coronavirus outbreak has required the kind of multi-pronged approach and long-term thinking that seems beyond him. This has always been a presidency of the here and now. It is not well equipped to deal with a public health and economic emergency that will dominate the rest of his presidency, whether he only gets to spend the next 10 months in the White House or another five years.

The Trump presidency has so often been about creating favourable optics even in the absence of real progress - his nuclear summitry with the North Korean despot Kim Jong-un offers a case in point. But the tricks of an illusionist, or the marketing skills of the sloganeer, do not work here. This is a national emergency, as countless others have pointed out, that can't be tweeted, nicknamed or hyped away. The facts are inescapable: the soaring numbers of the dead.

What have we learnt of the United States? First of all, we have seen the enduring goodness of this country. The Frenchman Alexis DeToqueville, whose observations in the early-19th Century did so much to demystify this rambunctious new republic, always told us: "America is great because she is good."

As with 9/11, we have marvelled at the selflessness and bravery of its first responders - the nurses, doctors, medical support staff and ambulance drivers who have turned up to the work with the same sense of public spiritedness shown by the firefighters who rushed towards the flaming Twin Towers. We've witnessed the ingenuity and creativity of schools that have transitioned to remote, online teaching without missing a beat. We've seen a can-do spirit that has kept stores open, shelves stocked and food being delivered. In other words, most Americans have shown precisely the same virtues we have seen in every country brought to a halt by the virus.

As for the American exceptionalism on display, much of it has been of the negative kind that makes it hard not to put head in hands. The lines outside gun stores. The spike in online sales of firearms - Ammo.com has seen a 70% increase in sales. The panic buying of AR-15s. Some Christian fundamentalists have rejected the epidemiology of this pandemic. To prove there was no virus, a pastor in Arkansas boasted his parishioners were prepared to lick the floor of his church.

Once again, those who live in developed nations have been left to ponder why the world's richest country does not have a system of universal healthcare. Ten years after the passage of Obamacare, more than 26 million Americans do not have health insurance.

Three reasons the US is more at risk
What can the West learn from Asia's coronavirus fight?
Rather than a coming together, the crisis has demonstrated how for decades Americans have conducted a political version of social distancing: the herd-like clustering of conservatives and liberals into like-minded communities caused by the allergic reaction to compatriots holding opposing political views. Once again, we have seen the familiar two Americas divide, the usual knee-jerk tribalism. Republicans have been twice as likely as Democrats to view coronavirus coverage as exaggerated. Three-quarters of Republicans say they trust the information coming from the president, whereas the figure among Democrats is just 8%.

As the Reverend Josh King told the Washington Post despairingly: "In your more politically conservative regions, closing is not interpreted as caring for you. It's interpreted as liberalism." Even on 13 March, when the CDC projected that up to 214 millions could be infected, Sean Davis, the co-founder of the right-wing website, The Federalist, tweeted: "Corporate political media hate you, they hate the country, and they will stop at nothing to reclaim power to rule over you. If that means destroying the economy via a panic they helped incite, all while running interference for the communist country that started it, so be it."

The latest Gallup polling shows the split: 94% of Republicans approve of his handling of the crisis, compared with 27% of Democrats. But overall, six out of ten Americans approve, pushing his approval rating up again to 49%, matching the highest score of his presidency. As with previous crises, such as 9/11, Americans tend to rally around the presidency, although Donald Trump remains a deeply polarising figure. After the attacks of September 11th, George W Bush's approval rating was over 90.


The political geography of America, with its red and blue state separatism, has even affected how voters are being physically exposed to the virus. Democrats tend to congregate in the cities, whose dense populations have made them hotspots. Republicans tend to live in more sparsely populated rural areas, which so far have not been so badly hit. Thus, the polarisation continues amidst the pandemic.

Rather than to the Trump White House, much of "Blue America" has looked for leadership to its state capitals: Democratic governors such as Andrew Cuomo in New York (who Trump tweeted should "do more"), Gavin Newsom in California (whom Trump has praised) and Jay Inslee in Washington state (whom the president called a "snake" during his visit to the CDC).

For American liberals, Dr Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has become the subversive hero of the hour. Offering an antidote to this post-truth presidency, Fauci sticks to scientific facts. After repeatedly contradicting Donald Trump over the seriousness of the outbreak, he is on his way to being viewed with the same affection and reverence as the liberal Supreme Court jurist Ruth Bader Ginsburg.


Fauci has become a phenomenon on social media
Surely the coronavirus outbreak will eventually lead to an end momentarily to the gridlock on Capitol Hill. Legislators have no other choice but to legislate given the enormity of the economic crisis and the spectre of a 21st Century Great Depression.

However, the first two attempts to pass a stimulus package failed amidst the usual partisan acrimony and brinksmanship. Republicans and Democrats are arguing over whether to include expansions of paid leave and unemployment benefits, and what the Democrats are calling a slush fund for corporate America that could be open to abuse. Once again, Capitol Hill's dysfunction has been shown to be both systemic and endemic.

Given the scale of the public health and economic crisis, the hope would be of a return to the patriotic bipartisanship that prevailed during much of the Fifties and early Sixties, which produced some of the major post-war reforms such as the construction of the interstate highway system and the landmark civil rights acts. History, after all, shows that US politicians co-operate most effectively in the face of a common enemy, whether it was the Soviet Union during the Cold War or al-Qaeda in the initial months after 9/11.

But the early response of lawmakers on Capitol Hill is far from encouraging. And if there is cross-party co-operation - as there will surely be in the end - it will not be the product of patriotic bipartisanship but rather freak-out bipartisanship, the legislative equivalent of panic buying.

The paradox here, as lawmakers face-off, is that crises erase philosophical lines. As in 2008, ideological conservatives have overnight become operational liberals. Those who ordinarily detest government have come in this emergency to depend on it. Corporate America, which is generally phobic towards federal intervention, is now desperate for government bailouts.

Trickle-down supply siders have become Keynesian big spenders, such is their desire for government stimulus spending funded by the taxpayer. Even universal basic income, a fringe idea popularised by the Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang, has gone mainstream. The US government intends to give $1,200 payments to every American.

In this call to national action, we have been reminded of how the federal government has been run down over the past 40 years partly because of an anti-government onslaught that started with Ronald Reagan. In 2018, the team responsible for pandemic response on the National Security Council at the White House was disbanded. The failure to carry out adequate testing, the key to containing outbreaks early on, is linked to a funding shortfall at the Department of Health and Human Services.

As with the attacks of 11 September 2001, warnings within government were repeatedly ignored. In recent years, there have been numerous exercises to test the country's preparedness for a pandemic - one of which involved a respiratory virus originating from China - that identified exactly the areas of vulnerability now being exposed. As with Hurricane Katrina, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has struggled. As ever, there are tensions between federal agencies and the states. The institutional decline of government that led so many Americans to pin their faith in an individual, Donald Trump, is again plain to see, whether in the shortage of masks and protective gowns or the dearth of early testing.

Consequently, America's claim to global pre-eminence looks less convincing by the day. While in previous crises, the world's most powerful superpower might have mobilised a global response, nobody expects that of the United States anymore. The neo-isolationism of three years of America Firstism has created a geopolitical form of social distancing, and this crisis has reminded us of the oceanic divide that has opened up even with Washington's closest allies. Take the European travel ban, which Trump announced during his Oval Office address to the nation without warning the countries affected. The European Union complained, in an unusually robust public statement, the decision was "taken unilaterally and without consultation".

Nor has the United States offered a model for how to deal with this crisis. South Korea, with its massive testing programme, and Japan have been exemplars. China, too, has shown the advantages of its authoritarianism system in enforcing a strict lockdown, which is especially worrying when the western liberal order looks so wobbly. Hopefully, nobody will forget how officials in China tried to cover up the virus for weeks and silenced whistleblowers, showing the country's ugly autocratic side even as the outbreak was spreading. But whereas Beijing managed to build a new hospital in just 10 days, the Pentagon will take weeks to move a naval hospital ship from its port in Virginia to New York harbour.

Politically, there will be so many ramifications. It is worth remembering, for example, that the Tea Party was as much a reaction to what was called the "big government conservatism" of George W Bush in response to the financial crisis as it was to the pigmentation of Barack Obama. The official history of the Tea Party movement states it came into existence on 3 October, 2008, when Bush signed into law TARP, the Troubled Asset Relief Programme which saved the failing banks. Tea-Partiers viewed that as an unacceptable encroachment of government power.

Likewise, it is worth bearing in mind that the two major convulsions of the 21st Century, the destruction of the Twin Towers and the collapse of Lehman Brothers, both ended up having a polarising effect on US politics. The fragile bipartisan 9/11 consensus was shattered by the Bush administration's decision to invade Iraq. The financial crisis fuelled the rise of the Tea Party and further radicalised the Republican Party.

What will be the impact on the presidential election? Judging by the Lazarus-like revival of Joe Biden, the signs are that Democrats are voting for normal. Clearly, a significant majority is not in the mood for the political revolution promised by Bernie Sanders. A 78-year-old whose candidacy was almost derailed in its early stages because he was so tactile looks again like a strong candidate in these socially distant times.


Many Americans are yearning for precisely the kind of empathy and personal warmth that Biden offers. Even before the coronavirus took hold, he had made recovery his theme, a narrative in accord with his life story. Many also want a presidency they could have on in the background. A less histrionic figure in the Oval Office. Soft jazz rather than heavy metal. A return to some kind of normalcy. But who would make any predictions? Only a few weeks ago, when the chaos of the Iowa caucuses seemed like a major story, we were prophesying Biden's political demise.

Besides, normalcy is not something we can expect to see for months, maybe even for years. Rather, the coronavirus could dramatically reshape American politics, much like the other massive historical convulsions of the past 100 years.

The Great Depression led to the New Deal, and its massive extension of federal power, through welfare programmes such as Social Security. It also made the Democrats, the champions of government, politically dominant. From 1932 onwards, the party won five consecutive presidential elections. World War II, among other social changes, gave impetus to the struggle for black equality, as African-American infantrymen who fought fascism on the same battlefields as white GIs demanded the same menu of civil rights on their return home. The attacks of 11 September made many Americans more wary of mass immigration and religious pluralism. The Great Recession undermined faith in the American Dream.

Liberals may be hoping the outbreak will highlight the need for universal healthcare, a New Deal-style revival of government, the return of a more fact-based polity and a stronger response to global warming, another planetary crisis which has the potential to paralyse and overwhelm so much of the world.

Conservatives may conclude the private sector rather than government is better equipped to deal with crises, amplifying their anti-government rhetoric, that gun controls should be further relaxed so that Americans can better protect themselves, and that individual liberties should not be constrained by nanny states.

Every day on my way to work, I pass the 9/11 memorial where the Twin Towers once stood, and watch people laying their flowers and muttering their quiet prayers. Many is the time I have wondered whether I would ever cover a more world-altering event. As I look out of my window on a quiet and eerie city that feels more like Gotham than New York, I fear we may be confronting it now.

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#1746517 - 03/25/20 02:50 PM Re: Covid-19 contin [Re: Milk Man]
Milk Man Offline

Hall of Famer

Registered: 11/01/08
Posts: 6952
Click the link for the thread that outlines spending packages for various agencies for the stimulus bill...

Tim Mak
@timkmak
Pandemic response bill appropriates $4,300,000,000 for the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). p. 119

Thread to follow includes other tidbits as I read Division B of the bill...

https://twitter.com/timkmak/status/1242876152513007617

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#1746556 - 03/25/20 05:45 PM Re: Covid-19 contin [Re: PerfectSpiral]
PitDAWG Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/10/06
Posts: 39773
Loc: Smyrna, TN.
G7 statement scrapped after U.S. insisted coronavirus be called "Wuhan virus"

Foreign ministers of the G7 countries failed to agree to a joint statement following a video conference Wednesday in part because the Trump administration insisted the statement refer to COVID-19 as the "Wuhan virus," Der Spiegel first reported and multiple U.S. outlets have confirmed.

Why it matters: The world's two most powerful countries are in a battle of narratives over the pandemic, with some in Beijing spreading disinformation about its origins and U.S. officials like Secretary of State Mike Pompeo increasingly blaming the Chinese government.

The phrase "Wuhan virus" has not been adopted by other countries, and G7 members considered it needlessly antagonistic.

The countries ultimately agreed on a common set of principles and actions to confront the coronavirus, and each released their own statements after the video conference.

https://www.axios.com/wuhan-virus-pompeo...mB68EstAmMowkrE

His stupidity knows no bounds.
_________________________
Sashi Brown was so bad at his job in Cleveland, no other NFL team would even offer him a job. He has been relegated to being in charge of "the culture" of an NBA team. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

#gmstrong

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#1746558 - 03/25/20 06:06 PM Re: Covid-19 contin [Re: PerfectSpiral]
PitDAWG Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/10/06
Posts: 39773
Loc: Smyrna, TN.
Coronavirus: Liberty University's Jerry Falwell Jr. welcomes students back amid pandemic

One professor slammed the move in an op-ed, saying, "Falwell's lack of concern does nothing to mitigate these students likely becoming vectors of the pathogen."

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/cor...s-back-n1167581

Moron.
_________________________
Sashi Brown was so bad at his job in Cleveland, no other NFL team would even offer him a job. He has been relegated to being in charge of "the culture" of an NBA team. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

#gmstrong

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#1746575 - 03/25/20 07:51 PM Re: Covid-19 contin [Re: PitDAWG]
PortlandDawg Offline

Hall of Famer

Registered: 09/11/06
Posts: 5741
Loc: Portland, OR
Originally Posted By: PitDAWG
Coronavirus: Liberty University's Jerry Falwell Jr. welcomes students back amid pandemic

One professor slammed the move in an op-ed, saying, "Falwell's lack of concern does nothing to mitigate these students likely becoming vectors of the pathogen."

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/cor...s-back-n1167581

Moron.


Let them all on campus... then put a fence around it. Let it run its course while providing medical care for those in need.
_________________________

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#1746582 - 03/25/20 08:05 PM Re: Covid-19 contin [Re: PortlandDawg]
northlima dawg Offline

Dawg Talker

Registered: 03/02/07
Posts: 1773
Originally Posted By: PortlandDawg
Originally Posted By: PitDAWG
Coronavirus: Liberty University's Jerry Falwell Jr. welcomes students back amid pandemic

One professor slammed the move in an op-ed, saying, "Falwell's lack of concern does nothing to mitigate these students likely becoming vectors of the pathogen."

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/cor...s-back-n1167581

Moron.


Let them all on campus... then put a fence around it. Let it run its course while providing medical care for those in need.


Looks like everyone is taking a class on Darwin and everyone gets an award

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#1746585 - 03/25/20 08:15 PM Re: Covid-19 contin [Re: mgh888]
northlima dawg Offline

Dawg Talker

Registered: 03/02/07
Posts: 1773
Originally Posted By: mgh888
Originally Posted By: 40YEARSWAITING
And Trump says we are nowhere near getting back to work but he has set a goal of Easter time.


That might the single most stupid thing Trump has ever said ... the list is long and there are a lot of contenders, yes, but man the guy is blindingly ignorant. And since you echo his every thought and post this as if you think it's a possibility, you are part of the issue too.

Do you think that the graph at the bottom of this page is likely to flatten or stop ascending anytime in the next 4 weeks?

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/us/

What would be the point of "getting back to work" or "getting back to normal" if the number of cases continue to climb at this rate or a similar rate?

You indicated that if the call was to go back to work tomorrow you would panic - well in 4 weeks, we won't have a cure, we won't have a vaccine, and the number of cases and the number of deaths are going to be exponentially higher than today .... so what would be the logic that it would be safe then?

I get that the economy and world cannot stop and cease ... but (as has been the point since the beginning) can we get people with knowledge and facts and intelligence making the decisions on what is best for the long term - instead of Trump with his false and fake words of positivity.




The overlords have spoken

Coronavirus: Billionaires want people back to work, but their employees aren't so sure

of New York City, March 25, 2020.PHOTO: REUTERS
PUBLISHED7 HOURS AGO

NEW YORK (BLOOMBERG) - The billionaire Tom Golisano was smoking a Padron cigar on his patio in Florida on Tuesday afternoon (March 24). He was worried.

"The damages of keeping the economy closed as it is could be worse than losing a few more people," said Mr Golisano, founder and chairman of the payroll processor Paychex.

"I have a very large concern that if businesses keep going along the way they're going then so many of them will have to fold."


President Donald Trump says he doesn't want the cure for the Covid-19 pandemic "to be worse than the problem", and some of America's wealthiest people and executives are echoing his rallying cry.

They want to revive an economy that could face its worst quarterly drop ever - even if it means pulling back on social distancing measures that public health officials say can help stop the coronavirus.

These investors aren't prizing profits over lives, they say, they're just willing to risk some horrors to avoid others.

"You're picking the better of two evils," said Mr Golisano, who wants people to go back to their offices in states that have been relatively spared by the coronavirus, but remain at home in hot spots.

Covid-19: Don't miss the latest on the outbreak and its impact
Stay in the know with e-mail alerts



"You have to weigh the pros and cons."

In New York, where hospitals are at a tipping point and getting pummelled by patients, Governor Andrew Cuomo says the economy shouldn't be restarted "at the cost of human life" and that he's developing a plan that "lets younger people get back to work".

The question is when they should do it.

Mr Trump, guided by a group of hedge fund and private equity titans, wants the country up and running again by Easter, though public health officials warn that's too soon for a virus that's killed more than 18,400 and infected at least 400,000 worldwide.


Interactive: How coronavirus is spreading across the world
Only companies with less than 500 employees are required to provide paid sick leave for workers out with Covid-19.

Economists from Northwestern University calculated that keeping social distancing practices in place until cases decline could save 600,000 lives nationwide.

Mr Lloyd Blankfein, who ran Goldman Sachs Group until 2018, helped kickstart the calls to get back to work on Sunday when he tweeted that "extreme measures to flatten the virus 'curve'" were sensible "for a time" but could crush the economy: "Within a very few weeks let those with a lower risk to the disease return to work."

His longtime deputy, Mr Gary Cohn, who left the bank to become Mr Trump's top economic adviser, asked if it was time "to start discussing the need for a date when the economy can turn back on".

Without clarity, businesses "will assume the worst", he said.

Mr Tilman Fertitta, owner of Golden Nugget casinos and Bubba Gump Shrimp, is calling on authorities to let businesses reopen at limited capacity in a couple of weeks to avoid a long economic disaster.

Mr Fertitta, who also owns the Houston Rockets and is worth US$3.2 billion (S$4.63 billion), said his company is "doing basically no business".

His demand goes against a school of thought that says prematurely reopening the economy could kill more people and eventually cause more economic harm.

Billionaires and other members of the elite have the luxury of social distancing while making money.

The ones who want workers back in their jobs say they're aiming to stop millions from suffering for years and falling further into debt.

Delivery drivers face pandemic without sick pay, insurance, sanitizer

Farm-to-door deliveries increase amid coronavirus

Officials are trying to accomplish that by restricting foreclosures and allowing Americans to defer mortgage payments.

"It's outrageous," said Mr Robert Reich, who was labour secretary for President Bill Clinton and now studies public policy at the University of California, Berkeley.

"It is absolutely necessary to shut down the economy so that millions of people don't die. For the privileged among us to fail to see that and to give the economy precedence over this public health emergency is morally reprehensible."

The push to restart the economy makes a certain amount of sense to rich people, according to Mr Reich, because they have come to expect disproportionate gains as the system's top winners.

"The one flaw in their logic this time is that the coronavirus doesn't understand class," he added. "The more people are in infected, the more likely it is that Blankfein and other billionaires will become infected as well."

Mr Jim Conway was a server in an Olive Garden in Pennsylvania until it closed about two weeks ago. He's been out of work and isn't getting paid while his application for unemployment benefits gets processed.

"Being an older worker, I'm in no hurry to go back in the middle of an epidemic," Mr Conway, 63, said.

"Being a server means you're in contact with lots of different people, and puts you at bigger risk of getting infected. I'm kind of glad they closed when they did."

He wants the outbreak under control before the restaurant reopens, but worries that politicians and businesses tend to focus on their bottom line before people like him.

"They've never really had our interests at heart," he said. "And now would be a weird time to start."

One of those government officials, Texas Lieutenant-Governor Dan Patrick, said on Fox News that Americans should get back to work and let "grandparents" take care of themselves.

Mr Dick Kovacevich, who ran Wells Fargo & Co until 2007, wants to see healthy workers below about 55 or so to return to work late next month if the outbreak is under control.

"We'll gradually bring those people back and see what happens. Some of them will get sick, some may even die, I don't know," said Mr Kovacevich, who was also the bank's chairman until 2009.

"Do you want to suffer more economically or take some risk that you'll get flu-like symptoms and a flu-like experience? Do you want to take an economic risk or a health risk? You get to choose."

Mr Mark Cuban, who owns the Dallas Mavericks, wants Americans to listen to epidemiologists instead.

"Ignore anything someone like me might say," Mr Cuban wrote in an e-mail. "Lives are at stake."

https://www.straitstimes.com/world/unite...loyees-arent-so

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#1746593 - 03/25/20 08:42 PM Re: Covid-19 contin [Re: northlima dawg]
northlima dawg Offline

Dawg Talker

Registered: 03/02/07
Posts: 1773
https://www.politico.com/news/2020/03/24/dhs-pandemic-coronavirus-146884

CORONAVIRUS

DHS wound down pandemic models before coronavirus struck
A vital modeling program was sidelined amid a bureaucratic battle, former officials say, leaving U.S. less prepared to face the virus.

Department of Homeland Security
From at least 2005 to 2017, an office inside DHS produced detailed analyses of what would happen to everything from transportation systems to hospitals if a pandemic hit the United States. | Alex Wong/Getty Images

By DANIEL LIPPMAN

03/24/2020 08:47 PM EDT




The Department of Homeland Security stopped updating its annual models of the havoc that pandemics would wreak on America’s critical infrastructure in 2017, according to current and former DHS officials with direct knowledge of the matter.

From at least 2005 to 2017, an office inside DHS, in tandem with analysts and supercomputers at several national laboratories, produced detailed analyses of what would happen to everything from transportation systems to hospitals if a pandemic hit the United States.



But the work abruptly stopped in 2017 amid a bureaucratic dispute over its value, two of the former officials said, leaving the department flat-footed as it seeks to stay ahead of the impact the COVID-19 outbreak is having on vast swaths of the U.S. economy. Officials at other agencies have requested some of the reports from the pandemic modeling unit at DHS in recent days, only to find the information they needed scattered or hard to find quickly.


And while department leaders dispute that, others say the confusion is just the latest example of the Trump administration’s struggle to respond to an outbreak that has sickened more than 50,000 Americans and threatens to overwhelm hospitals and other health care providers. Officials are now scrambling to secure enough masks, respirators and ventilators to meet the rapidly exploding need. Doctors and nurses are reusing their protective gear as supplies dwindle; governors are begging the administration for federal help that has been slow to arrive.

The models — primarily computer simulations that seek to anticipate the interaction of millions of Americans and U.S. infrastructure systems — were overseen by the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center, a program that has been run by a shifting alphabet soup of agencies within DHS, reflecting the continual bureaucratic reshuffling that has plagued the department since its inception in 2002.

Some of the modeling unit’s analyses looked at what would happen if a large portion of the U.S. workforce — say, 40 percent — got sick or couldn’t show up at work to maintain and operate key aspects of the national infrastructure, such as the systems that keep planes flying safely. The reports were meant to guide policymakers toward areas that would demand their attention in the event of an outbreak.



One 2015 DHS report, based partly on data produced by NISAC, warned that America’s public and private health systems might “experience significant shortages in vaccines, antivirals, pharmaceuticals needed to treat secondary infections and complications, personal protective equipment (PPE), and medical equipment, including ventilators.”

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Juliette Kayyem, a senior DHS official in the Obama administration, praised the quality of the NISAC reports she received when she was at the department, and criticized DHS for being “singularly focused on border enforcement” under Trump at the expense of properly planning for other threats, like a pandemic.

“We should not be surprised that a department that has for the last 3½ years viewed itself solely as a border enforcement agency seems ill-equipped to address a much greater threat to the homeland,” she said.

In recent days, as the government raced to address the growing demands, officials at the Department of Health and Human Services asked their counterparts at DHS to dig up some of the old reports and analyses, according to two former DHS officials. The request came from within HHS’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, which works to ensure that the country has enough medical equipment and drugs to deal with public health emergencies and everyday health needs.

But Homeland Security officials initially had trouble finding some documents related to planning for a pandemic, including 2007 and 2009 pandemic reports, as well as a report produced for a 2014 exercise held by senior policymakers, according to the former officials — although some were eventually found and put in a ZIP file sent to HHS.

“Nobody even knew where any of the documents were anymore,” one of the former officials said. “It’s really just a source of frustration.”

The former DHS officials said if the pandemic models had been maintained properly, the administration might have had an earlier understanding of where shortages might occur, and acted accordingly to address them.

“A lot of what we’re doing now is shooting in the dark, and there’s going to be secondary impacts to infrastructure that are going to be felt in part because we didn’t maintain these models,” said one of the former DHS officials. “Our ability to potentially foresee where the impacts are or may manifest is a result of the fact that we don’t have the capabilities anymore.”

The pandemic models emerged as part of a broader shift in the federal government’s thinking after Hurricane Katrina, when DHS and FEMA came under heavy criticism for their response to the disaster.

With those searing lessons still fresh, DHS broadened its focus from a narrow set of issues — primarily terrorist attacks within the United States — to preventing and preparing for all types of emergency events. The department began modeling and analyzing how severe events, including a pandemic, could affect critical infrastructure and hit supply chains.

Some of the predictions in the July 2015 DHS report were eerily prescient about the kinds of issues that the U.S. has faced in recent weeks because of the coronavirus; the report said that “a severe influenza pandemic could overwhelm the Healthcare and Public Health Sector in as little as 3-6 weeks” and warned that healthcare facilities in cities could be swamped.

The report also warned that basic medical supplies for emergency services could be at risk because they’re dependent on “just-in-time” deliveries of health care supplies, and a big increase in demand during a pandemic would make it harder for them to get what they need.

Much of the blame for the switch in focus at DHS, according to two of the former officials, falls on longtime DHS employee Robert Hanson, who became division director of prioritization and modeling at the department’s Office of Cyber and Infrastructure Analysis in May 2016.



When he was elevated to that job, Hanson wanted to focus more on visualizations of events like hurricanes and “going down rabbit holes that really didn’t need to be done,” according to one of the former officials. He also wanted to focus more on elections and cybersecurity because “cyber is the magic word to attract money,” said the other former official.



“They’ve allowed a lot of capability to decay, including the pandemic models and transportation models and a whole bunch of other stuff in favor of chasing the soccer ball on different cyber things,” including trying to use machine learning and AI in work on cybersecurity, this person said.

In an interview, Hanson acknowledged reallocating some funding away from pandemic modeling to other topics of research because he had “been given direction by my leadership at the time to reprioritize a lot of the projects,” and he agreed it was necessary. He also said when he took over the modeling program, it was considered “ineffective” by DHS leadership and by executive branch overseers.

Hanson thought, too, that pandemic modeling was best done by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the former DHS officials said, although the CDC’s mandate is different and researchers there don’t focus on how a pandemic could affect infrastructure not related to health care.

After an uprising by staff last year who complained about what they called his abusive management style and lack of leadership, Hanson was removed as the assistant director of analysis at the National Risk Management Center, OCIA’s successor organization, according to the two former DHS officials. Hanson and his deputy, Carmen Zapata, were detailed elsewhere within DHS.

Explaining his departure, Hanson said he “had made such fundamental changes to the program that some of the staff were unhappy with me and were going to see me as an object of ire so I decided to leave.”

NISAC, the DHS office that oversaw the models, began as a partnership between the Los Alamos and Sandia national laboratories in 1999 but in 2003 was folded into DHS by the USA Patriot Act and in 2014 put under OCIA, which has listed analyzing “pandemic influenza” as a top priority.

The program’s costs were considerable: The government had to regularly purchase data sets to keep the models current, while also paying for coding, operations and maintenance, along with the original development costs. From six and 10 people at Los Alamos were focused on pandemics and a total of 60 to 70 people at DHS and the national labs had some role in the models, according to one of the former officials.

Beginning under the George W. Bush administration, all critical infrastructure in the U.S. was segregated into different categories, which now comprise 16 sectors. DHS was made a lead agency for 10 of them, including IT, communications, critical manufacturing and commercial facilities.

The DHS models were designed to look at the impacts of a pandemic on the different sectors within the department’s bailiwick, as well as other sectors that touched on homeland security. For instance, one report NISAC worked on for a table-top exercise looked at how to combat a hypothetical epidemic in Southeast Asia, what travel restrictions to put in place and how to design social distancing to stop the epidemic inside the United States.




The simulations the modeling unit produced also helped the department understand the impact a pandemic might have on its own workforce. More than 9,700 DHS employees are quarantined or self-monitoring because of the virus, and 73 employees were confirmed or presumed COVID-19 positive as of Monday, according to a person familiar with the numbers.


The modeling unit’s work also addressed real-life impacts to infrastructure due to smaller-scale outbreaks, including the H5N1 bird flu in 2007, H1N1 in 2009, Ebola in 2014 and the Zika virus in early 2016.

During the Ebola outbreak, the Obama White House asked the unit to support its decision-making on deliberations about banning travel from certain countries based on risk, whether to close any borders and how to spend money on airport screening, according to one of the former DHS officials.

Reports based on the models were usually emailed to DHS leadership and sometimes officials in the White House. There were also about 20,000 people on the distribution list, including a wide group of critical infrastructure owner-operators and state officials. Some of the papers ran to 150 pages.

It wouldn’t be easy for DHS to rebuild its capacity to model pandemics, given the brain drain within the department: Many of the people who worked on the models have now scattered across the government or left government service altogether, one of the former officials said.

“There’s no institutional memory whatsoever,” this person said.

NISAC was “really, really good” about studying the impacts of pandemics, a former Trump official said, but there’s been “so much turnover that people just don’t know that [their work] exists and there’s been very poor work to catalogue and keep lessons learned.”

Hanson insisted that DHS maintained the capability at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and that the system is still being used today by DHS to inform decisions on the coronavirus across the federal government, but he couldn’t recall the full name of the PNNL staffer he said was in charge of the model now.

Meanwhile, current officials are left essentially to reinvent the wheel in the middle of a pandemic that has already claimed more than 600 American lives.

Bob Kolasky, director of the National Risk Management Center, OCIA’s successor organization within DHS’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, recently told employees to write a plan for how to respond to the virus by early this week, but some employees aren’t confident that any plan they come up with will actually be used, according to one of the former DHS officials.

Asked for comment, Kolasky said his division of DHS “has been out front and actively working with partners to provide guidance as they make risk-based decisions during the COVID 19 response. The National Risk Management Center continues to use NISAC, along with other government and private sector resources, to provide valuable insight and assessments to our stakeholders.”

“I’ve heard people say it’s a black swan. It’s not a black swan,” said one of the former DHS officials. “This is the whitest of white swans. This was absolutely inevitable, and the fact is we didn’t even maintain the capacity that we had or even the records of what we had done so that information could be quickly located and turned over to people who are making the critical operations right now.”

Betsy Woodruff Swan contributed to this report.

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#1746636 - 03/26/20 01:56 AM Re: Covid-19 contin [Re: northlima dawg]
Clemdawg Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/22/06
Posts: 11747
Loc: 2 bubbles off of plumb
_________________________
#gmstrong

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#1746639 - 03/26/20 02:27 AM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: PrplPplEater]
fishtheice Offline

Dawg Talker

Registered: 10/14/06
Posts: 1295
Originally Posted By: PrplPplEater
I'm afraid to see just how much utterly useless and pointless crap was stuffed into this thing.



Here's one: Ballot Harvesting




Hans von Spakovsky: Pelosi’s Coronavirus Plan Would Make Election Fraud Easier


Robert Kraychik

25 Mar 2020


House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) sought to insert legislative measures into a coronavirus relief bill to “make it easier to cheat” in elections, explained Hans von Spakovsky, manager of the Heritage Foundation’s Election Law Reform Initiative and a senior legal fellow of the Meese Center for Legal and Judicial Studies, on Tuesday’s edition of SiriusXM’s Breitbart News Tonight with host Rebecca Mansour and special guest host John Hayward.

Von Spakovsky said, “It’s an attempt to use the coronavirus and the medical crisis we face to force all these changes and election laws the left has been pushing for quite a while, in fact, they took all these provisions out of H.R.1 — which is the first bill the Democrats introduced in the House after they took over when they won the 2018 election, and these rules were all intended to basically make it easier to manipulate elections, and frankly, make it easier to cheat, and they have absolutely nothing to do whatsoever with helping the country deal with the coronavirus.”


https://www.breitbart.com/radio/2020/03/...rU0-4cU1xJjCMb4

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#1746669 - 03/26/20 09:28 AM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: PerfectSpiral]
OldColdDawg Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/28/06
Posts: 19348
Loc: Lancaster, Ohio
So I was listening to the news about the US Government's (richest country in the world) one time $1200 checks being sent out help Americans during the pandemic... a canadian poster on FB was kind enough to remind me that Canada (not the richest country in the world) announced $2000 checks for 4 months two weeks ago... Is Canada the Venezuela of the north? How can they do socialized medicine and larger checks? I guess a balanced blend of capitalism and socialism (like social democrats pitch) makes for a better social safety net and pandemic response. Or maybe it's the leaders...


Edited by OldColdDawg (03/26/20 09:34 AM)
_________________________
#gmstrong

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#1746674 - 03/26/20 09:37 AM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: fishtheice]
Damanshot Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/11/06
Posts: 38128
Loc: Aurora, Ohio
Originally Posted By: fishtheice
Originally Posted By: PrplPplEater
I'm afraid to see just how much utterly useless and pointless crap was stuffed into this thing.



Here's one: Ballot Harvesting




Hans von Spakovsky: Pelosi’s Coronavirus Plan Would Make Election Fraud Easier


Robert Kraychik

25 Mar 2020


House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) sought to insert legislative measures into a coronavirus relief bill to “make it easier to cheat” in elections, explained Hans von Spakovsky, manager of the Heritage Foundation’s Election Law Reform Initiative and a senior legal fellow of the Meese Center for Legal and Judicial Studies, on Tuesday’s edition of SiriusXM’s Breitbart News Tonight with host Rebecca Mansour and special guest host John Hayward.

Von Spakovsky said, “It’s an attempt to use the coronavirus and the medical crisis we face to force all these changes and election laws the left has been pushing for quite a while, in fact, they took all these provisions out of H.R.1 — which is the first bill the Democrats introduced in the House after they took over when they won the 2018 election, and these rules were all intended to basically make it easier to manipulate elections, and frankly, make it easier to cheat, and they have absolutely nothing to do whatsoever with helping the country deal with the coronavirus.”


https://www.breitbart.com/radio/2020/03/...rU0-4cU1xJjCMb4


Worse than Gerrymandering? Worse than Voter suppression? Things that the Republicans are so good at.
_________________________
#GMSTRONG

“Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.”
Daniel Patrick Moynahan

"Alternative facts hurt us all. Think before you blindly believe."
Damanshot

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#1746680 - 03/26/20 09:46 AM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: Damanshot]
OldColdDawg Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/28/06
Posts: 19348
Loc: Lancaster, Ohio
Don't even bother talking about it. IT's pure Breitbart Trumpian alt-right BS.
_________________________
#gmstrong

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#1746683 - 03/26/20 09:52 AM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: Damanshot]
mgh888 Offline

Hall of Famer

Registered: 03/15/13
Posts: 5673
Originally Posted By: Damanshot


Worse than Gerrymandering? Worse than Voter suppression? Things that the Republicans are so good at.


You know which party is the party to have ACTUALLY been caught and prosecuted for voter fraud/tampering? Yep - the one that talks about this as if it's a massive problem - the one that set up a oversight committee to investigate ... and found basically NADA.

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#1746702 - 03/26/20 10:41 AM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: OldColdDawg]
Jester Offline

Hall of Famer

Registered: 09/17/06
Posts: 6334
Loc: Charlotte
Originally Posted By: OldColdDawg
Or maybe it's the leaders...


Ding, ding, ding
_________________________
What if dogs chewed your shoes because shoes are the last thing you put on before you leave?

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#1746720 - 03/26/20 11:35 AM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: OldColdDawg]
BADdog Offline

Hall of Famer

Registered: 09/11/06
Posts: 3334
Loc: NYC
Originally Posted By: OldColdDawg
So I was listening to the news about the US Government's (richest country in the world) one time $1200 checks being sent out help Americans during the pandemic... a canadian poster on FB was kind enough to remind me that Canada (not the richest country in the world) announced $2000 checks for 4 months two weeks ago... Is Canada the Venezuela of the north? How can they do socialized medicine and larger checks? I guess a balanced blend of capitalism and socialism (like social democrats pitch) makes for a better social safety net and pandemic response. Or maybe it's the leaders...


That system does not help the rich get richer
_________________________
The poor the tired the huddled masses made America great.


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#1746721 - 03/26/20 11:42 AM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: BADdog]
PitDAWG Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/10/06
Posts: 39773
Loc: Smyrna, TN.
America's richest 400 families now pay a lower tax rate than the middle class

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/americas-ri...e-middle-class/

Mmmmm, hmmmm.
_________________________
Sashi Brown was so bad at his job in Cleveland, no other NFL team would even offer him a job. He has been relegated to being in charge of "the culture" of an NBA team. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

#gmstrong

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#1746723 - 03/26/20 11:44 AM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: PitDAWG]
BADdog Offline

Hall of Famer

Registered: 09/11/06
Posts: 3334
Loc: NYC
Hey has everyone used the postcards for filing their taxes?
Great work giving tax cuts to the rich and providing simple card filing for everyone.
_________________________
The poor the tired the huddled masses made America great.


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#1746724 - 03/26/20 11:47 AM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: BADdog]
PitDAWG Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/10/06
Posts: 39773
Loc: Smyrna, TN.
j/c

Warren County mega church still holds services

WARREN COUNTY, Ohio (WKEF/ WRGT) -- A Warren County mega church held services Wednesday night despite Ohio’s stay-at-home order banning large gatherings.

As we all work to stop the spread of COVID-19 many churches in the state are streaming their services online.

Solid Rock Church in Monroe is one of them, but unlike most churches Solid Rock is also holding service as usual.

Although the stay-at-home order doesn’t force religious organizations to close, Gov. Mike DeWine stressed that people coming together right now is dangerous.

However, many church-goers said they feel safe.

“I think that it honors God to trust him and to continue to meet and pray and trust that he's our healer, and he'll protect us,” said Jeremiah York, who has visited the church in the past.

The church released a statement on its website about continuing services.

We at Solid Rock Church share everyone’s concern to help keep people safe. The First Amendment of our Constitution guarantees freedom concerning religion, expression, and assembly. It specifically forbids congress from restricting an individual’s religious practices. Therefore, the government ban on large gatherings does not apply to religious worship.

There is no pressure from Solid Rock Church to require anyone to come to our services. We are respectful of every individual’s right to choose either to come to our service or to watch online.

We do believe that it is important for our doors to remain open for whomever to come to worship and pray during this time of great challenge in our country.

But many on social media are outraged by the church's choice.

One person wrote, “I’ll be praying you people wake up and realize you are putting everyone at risk.“

Another commented, “Read your Bible and pray from your own home."

York said he thinks the faithful thing to do is not be afraid.

“Trust God and just use wisdom,” said York.

The Warren County prosecutor made clear the church can’t face any fines because it’s exempt from the mass gathering order.

https://dayton247now.com/news/coronavirus/warren-county-mega-church-still-holds-service

Brings a whole new meaning to, "Paying my bills is killing me!"
_________________________
Sashi Brown was so bad at his job in Cleveland, no other NFL team would even offer him a job. He has been relegated to being in charge of "the culture" of an NBA team. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

#gmstrong

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#1746725 - 03/26/20 11:50 AM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: PitDAWG]
BADdog Offline

Hall of Famer

Registered: 09/11/06
Posts: 3334
Loc: NYC
Do these people realize one of the biggest first outbreaks in the US came from a synagogue? The trump virus doesnt believe in god.
_________________________
The poor the tired the huddled masses made America great.


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#1746727 - 03/26/20 11:55 AM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: BADdog]
Day of the Dawg Offline

Dawg Talker

Registered: 03/13/13
Posts: 2395
Originally Posted By: BADdog
Do these people realize one of the biggest first outbreaks in the US came from a synagogue? The trump virus doesnt believe in god.


The Trump virus. Shame on you! Take the side of China over our President. The virus came from China. China with held information from the rest of the world to attempt to hide the issue. Instead caused this issue to get out of hand.

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#1746728 - 03/26/20 11:56 AM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: Day of the Dawg]
OldColdDawg Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/28/06
Posts: 19348
Loc: Lancaster, Ohio
Originally Posted By: Day of the Dawg
Originally Posted By: BADdog
Do these people realize one of the biggest first outbreaks in the US came from a synagogue? The trump virus doesnt believe in god.


The Trump virus. Shame on you! Take the side of China over our President. The virus came from China. China with held information from the rest of the world to attempt to hide the issue. Instead caused this issue to get out of hand.


^triggered.
_________________________
#gmstrong

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#1746731 - 03/26/20 12:00 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: PerfectSpiral]
PitDAWG Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/10/06
Posts: 39773
Loc: Smyrna, TN.
j/c

I'm An ER Doctor In NYC. Trump's Coronavirus Plan Isn't Just Dangerous, It's Deadly.

Dear Mr. President,

I am an emergency medicine resident physician in one of the biggest hospital systems in New York City, the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. In the past several weeks, I have taken care of countless patients with COVID-19 &#8213; some who didn’t seem so sick and some blue in the face and gasping for air 70 times a minute. I have put my face inches from theirs and inserted breathing tubes into their trachea, putting myself and everyone else in the room at exponentially higher risk of contracting this disease.

As I’ve sat in a room full of coughing patients for 60 hours a week, I have worried about my own safety now and in the coming months as this pandemic gets worse and our completely inadequate supply of personal protective equipment rapidly disappears. There is a major shortage of face masks, along with other supplies, across the country and without them, it can be next to impossible to keep health care workers safe and working to support the increasing number of patients who are arriving at our hospital and clinic doors.

I have sent some not-so-sick patients home and I have seen some patients die right in front of my eyes. I have spoken on the phone to the sobbing mother of a young man admitted to the intensive care unit, and told her, “No, you are not allowed to enter the hospital to see your critically ill son because we are not letting family members into the hospital during this pandemic.” To say that I have experienced countless heartbreaking moments over the past several weeks would be an understatement.

In the next couple of days or weeks, we will run out of hospital beds and ventilators. The number of critically ill COVID-19 patients who come to my hospital seems to double every day. If things continue this way, I will soon be forced to make decisions about who deserves a shot at life and who I will allow to die, and that is an unthinkable thing to have to consider, much less do.

Tell me &#8213; when there is only one ventilator available, should it go to the young nurse or the elderly woman with multiple comorbidities who has an advanced directive that says “do not intubate/do not resuscitate”? How about the single mother of three? Or the deeply respected emergency medicine attending doctor I worked with last week? How about the middle-aged man with some medical comorbidities and corny jokes who reminds me of my father &#8213; or is my father? Or maybe the person in prison for rape? How about the person of color in jail for marijuana possession? How about a beloved and wealthy celebrity? How about the homeless person with alcohol use disorder who spits on my fellow medical professionals and me when we try to help? How about the homeless person who lives on my street corner and smiles at me every day and says “God bless you”? It’s not so easy choose, is it?

This past week, between 12-hour shifts working in the emergency department and the newly created COVID respiratory unit, I have done everything I can think of to stop that nightmare scenario from arriving. I have posted on social media begging my friends and family to stay home. I have signed countless petitions and contacted my local government pleading for more personal protective equipment and ventilators. If I learn of other things I can do, I will do those, too.

My governor, Andrew Cuomo, has tirelessly worked to obtain more personal protective equipment and ventilators. He has begged you to nationalize the effort to acquire medical supplies and you have denied him. He’s begged for citizens to stay home and, while some are listening, many are not and if they don’t, it will be disastrous. But there’s only so much the governor &#8213; or any of us &#8213; can do alone. At this point, there may be only so much we can do together. But we must try.

On Tuesday you told Fox News you would “ love to have the country opened up and raring to go by Easter.” You said you chose Easter because, “you will have packed churches all over our country, I think it would be a beautiful time and it is just about the timeline that I think is right.” The thought of this makes me nauseous. If we do that, exponentially more people will get this disease, our hospital system will not have the capacity to handle it, and health care professionals like me will have to let countless people die while continuing to put our own lives &#8213; and possibly the lives of the people we love &#8213; at risk.

When we run out of ventilators &#8213; and we will if we lift the social distancing restrictions that are in place and this pandemic continues to spread as it already has &#8213; I will not be ready to make these decisions about who deserves to live and who deserves to die. When those moments come, I do not know how I will be able to sleep at night. Will you? Now is not the time to let our guards down.

You have the power to be remembered as someone who did the right thing. I beg you to help me and other health care workers save countless lives &#8213; possibly including our own &#8213; so that we as a nation don’t have to suffer the unthinkable devastation looming on the horizon. I beg you to take this pandemic more seriously and I am begging you to do it now.

Sincerely,

Rachel Sobolev, MD

https://www.yahoo.com/huffpost/new-york-...-183638991.html
_________________________
Sashi Brown was so bad at his job in Cleveland, no other NFL team would even offer him a job. He has been relegated to being in charge of "the culture" of an NBA team. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

#gmstrong

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#1746745 - 03/26/20 12:49 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: PerfectSpiral]
PitDAWG Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/10/06
Posts: 39773
Loc: Smyrna, TN.
j/c

Just a reminder to all of the young people complaining about staying indoors and missing their spring breaks.

People your age had something to look forward to as well from 1964 to 1973. Being drafted and sent to Vietnam.

You think you have to sacrifice? Shut the hell up!
_________________________
Sashi Brown was so bad at his job in Cleveland, no other NFL team would even offer him a job. He has been relegated to being in charge of "the culture" of an NBA team. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

#gmstrong

Top
#1746750 - 03/26/20 12:58 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: PitDAWG]
mgh888 Offline

Hall of Famer

Registered: 03/15/13
Posts: 5673
https://www.yahoo.com/huffpost/new-york-...-183638991.html

A great read. Something that none of us can really argue with or dismiss... but no doubt the Trump faithful will try.

As for the "suffering" and to put it into perspective - Anne Frank and 7 others hid for 2 years in a 450 sq ft living space. Anyone complaining in today's day and age needs a new perspective on what a challenge is.

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#1746755 - 03/26/20 01:04 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: mgh888]
PitDAWG Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/10/06
Posts: 39773
Loc: Smyrna, TN.
j/c

Texas Lt. Governor: Old People Should Volunteer to Die to Save the Economy

According to Dan Patrick “lots of grandparents” are willing to sacrifice themselves for the cause.

After doing a brief, weeklong impression of a semiresponsible human being, on Monday, Donald Trump got back to the business of being a reckless, anti-science moron, floating the idea that we should end this social-distancing business sooner rather than later in order to “save” the economy from the coronavirus. (We’re using scare quotes here because apparently the president hasn’t considered the fact that if hundreds of thousands or even millions of Americans die, the economy will be in worse shape than it is now.) Following his National Economic Council chairman’s declaration that “we’re gonna have to make some difficult trade-offs,” i.e. we’re going to have to let some people die so the stock market can live, Trump told reporters during an evening press conference that while the death toll is “bad,” and “the numbers are going to increase with time,” we’re “going to be opening our country up for business, because our country was meant to be open.“ That suggestion was obviously horrifying to people who still take the word of health experts over that of a brainless carnival barker and who understand that extreme social distancing needs to last for at least several months if not longer. One person who thought it was downright inspired? Texas Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick, who is of the opinion that old people, i.e. those most at risk, should volunteer to die to save the economy.

Appearing on Fox News, Patrick told Tucker Carlson, “No one reached out to me and said, ‘As a senior citizen, are you willing to take a chance on your survival in exchange for keeping the America that all America loves for your children and grandchildren?’” But if they had? “If that is the exchange, I’m all in,” Patrick said. He continued: “That doesn’t make me noble or brave or anything like that. I just think there are lots of grandparents out there in this country, like me, I have six grandchildren, that what we all care about and what we love more than anything are those children. And I want to live smart and see through this, but I don’t want the whole country to be sacrificed…I’ve talked to hundreds of people, Tucker, and just in the last week, making calls all the time, and everyone says pretty much the same thing. That we can’t lose our whole country, we’re having an economic collapse. I’m also a small businessman, I understand it. And I talk with businesspeople all the time, Tucker. My heart is lifted tonight by what I heard the president say because we can do more than one thing at a time, we can do two things. So my message is let’s get back to work, let’s get back to living. Let’s be smart about it and those of us who are 70-plus, we’ll take care of ourselves. But don’t sacrifice the country, don’t do that, don’t ruin this great America.”

At this point, Tucker Carlson, who, alarmingly, could be our only hope, asked, “So you’re basically saying that this disease could take your life but that’s not the scariest thing to you, there’s something that could be worse than dying?” Put in those terms, Patrick appeared momentarily taken aback but responded, “Yeah.”

Elsewhere in sociopathic responses to the COVID-19 crisis, during last night’s press conference Trump tried a spin on his previous “the flu is so much worse” take, telling reporters, “You look at automobile accidents. Which are far greater than any numbers we’re talking about. That doesn’t mean we’re going to tell everybody no more driving of cars.” He also acknowledged that actual doctors are in disagreement with his proposal to “open up the country for business” in short order, but screw those guys.

https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2020/03/dan-patrick-coronavirus-grandparents
_________________________
Sashi Brown was so bad at his job in Cleveland, no other NFL team would even offer him a job. He has been relegated to being in charge of "the culture" of an NBA team. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

#gmstrong

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#1746758 - 03/26/20 01:13 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: PerfectSpiral]
PitDAWG Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/10/06
Posts: 39773
Loc: Smyrna, TN.
Mississippi governor says state won't be a dictatorship on coronavirus

Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves (R) said in a Twitter post Wednesday that he rejects "dictatorship models like China," a day after he signed an executive order in response to the novel coronavirus.

Details: Reeves' order Tuesday aims to limit people's physical interactions, but the Jackson Free Press notes it "seems to declare that most types of businesses in Mississippi are 'essential' and thus exempt from social-distancing requirements," including public and private industries and institutions. The move caused confusion as to whether it overrides stay-at-home orders issued by local authorities, Mississippi Today reports.

What he's saying: "We're following our experts and I’ve spent many sleepless nights praying for wisdom in this unprecedented time," Reeves tweeted.

Context: Reeves made the comments in response to a segment on "The Rachel Maddow Show" Tuesday on Mississippi not enacting a stay-at-home order, and a subsequent post of a video on MSNBC's website Tuesday, headlined: "Mississippi governor untroubled by COVID crises in neighboring states." Reeves called the report a "dangerous lie."

The big picture: Mississippi had confirmed 377 cases and five deaths from the virus Wednesday, per the state health department.

21 state governors, mostly Democrats, had issued stay-at-home orders by Wednesday night.

https://www.axios.com/coronavirus-missis...YLKakiS9AjWT93c

Murica!
_________________________
Sashi Brown was so bad at his job in Cleveland, no other NFL team would even offer him a job. He has been relegated to being in charge of "the culture" of an NBA team. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

#gmstrong

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#1746767 - 03/26/20 01:59 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: OldColdDawg]
fishtheice Offline

Dawg Talker

Registered: 10/14/06
Posts: 1295
It's all real...no BS!

Ballot Fraud, American-Style ... and Its Bitter Harvests
By Eric Eggers, RealClearInvestigations


December 13, 2018



America's electoral obsession isn't Russian meddling anymore. It's ballot-harvesting, a long-disputed practice implicated in fraud that's come to the fore with the nationwide embrace of absentee voting in recent years -- and especially in last month's midterms.
Absentee ballot: Source of empowerment, and mischief.
AP Photo/Alan Diaz

With ballot-harvesting, paper votes are collected by intermediaries who deliver them to polling officials, presumably increasing voter turnout but also creating opportunities for mischief.

The latter is suspected in North Carolina, where uncharacteristic Democratic charges of vote fraud prompted an investigation into whether Republican-paid political operatives illegally collected and possibly stole absentee ballots in a still-undecided congressional race. A national spotlight was shone by The New York Times, which, like Democrats, often minimizes vote fraud; it flooded the zone in this case, assigning five reporters to a single story.

In California, by contrast, Democrats exulted as they credited a quietly passed 2016 law legalizing ballot-harvesting with their recent sweep of House seats in the former Republican stronghold of Orange County, thereby helping them win control of the House.

In that case, it was Republican eyebrows that were arched. Speaker Paul Ryan said what happened in California “defies logic.”

In Orange County, an estimated 250,000 harvested ballots were reportedly dropped off on Election Day alone. County Republican Chairman Fred Whitaker claimed the 2016 law "directly caused the switch from being ahead on election night to losing two weeks later.”

One interaction caught by a Santa Clarita family’s doorbell camera suggested how harvesting can work in practice. A harvester, identifying herself as Lulu, asks for Brandi, and says she is there to collect her ballot, explaining that there is “this new service, but only to, like, people who are supporting the Democratic Party.”

However, there is no evidence that ballots were marked or discarded by those harvesting the ballots, as is alleged in North Carolina.

Election officials there have refused to certify Republican Mark Harris’s victory over Democrat Dan McReady in the state’s 9th Congressional District, and Rep. Gerry Connolly of Virginia, a Democratic member of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, is seeking an emergency hearing into possible voter fraud in that race.

"Votes have been stolen by preying on senior and minority voters, and now a cloud of doubt and suspicion hangs over this election result," Connolly said.
Leslie McCrae Dowless Jr.: North Carolina vote man.
Travis Long/The News & Observer via AP

North Carolina absentee ballots require a “witness,” or second signature, to verify the voter’s identity. In Republican-heavy Bladen County, the same people were signing as witnesses for numerous absentee ballots, a telltale sign that they were being “harvested.”

In fact, one TV station interviewed a harvester who claimed she was paid by Leslie McCrae Dowless Jr., a local political operative, between $75 and $100 a week to pick up completed absentee ballots. Dowless has worked for numerous North Carolina politicians of both political parties.

Dowless’s connection to Harris’s campaign, which paid Harris’s employer $428,000 for administrative, staff and grassroots services, is prompting a national look at ballot harvesting, which is considered election fraud because North Carolina law specifically prohibits anyone from collecting ballots.

But evidence is emerging that Dowless wasn’t the only one harvesting in the Tar Heel State.

WBTV, a Charlotte station, reviewed 796 official ballot envelopes of votes cast in Bladen County. The review identified 110 that were signed by two women who are listed as having been paid by a PAC connected to the North Carolina Democratic Party.

North Carolina is but one example of dubious ballot-harvesting nationwide. The practice is so common, harvesters even have their own region-specific names. In Florida, they’re known as “boleteros.” In Texas, they’re called "politiqueras."
Penny Hubbard (left): Delayed win overruled.
Christian Gooden/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP

In Missouri, Democratic state Rep. Penny Hubbard, a member of a St. Louis political dynasty known for ballot harvesting, was challenged and ultimately ousted in 2016 by progressive Bruce Franks, a protester in the Ferguson unrest. Absentee-ballot handling irregularities had handed her a delayed 90-vote win, even though Franks won 53 percent of the vote on Election Day.

In Florida, a Palm Beach Post investigation into numerous 2016 primary races uncovered significant evidence of voter fraud by Democratic candidates, who pushed back on any criticism by claiming racial discrimination.

Three Democratic candidates, County Commissioner Mack Bernard, state Rep. Al Jacquet, and a candidate for state Senate, Bobby Powell, all ordered mail ballots on behalf of constituents, in many cases without those constituents’ knowledge. Then, they either filed out the ballots for them or had them fill out the ballots while the candidates were present in their homes. All three candidates would win on the strength of massive margins in absentee votes.
Mack Bernard: Hands-on assistance.
Florida House of Representatives/Wikimedia

One Boynton Beach couple told the Post that Bernard just showed up at their door one day in August. Joseph Cerfius, a blind Haitian man, said he didn’t even know who Bernard was, or that he was a candidate for office. But Bernard produced a ballot, filled it out on Cerfius’s behalf, then actually signed Cerfius’s name.

“I couldn’t sign because I can’t see,” Cerfius said. “I gave him my voting card number. That’s all I did. He wrote my name.”

With a presidential election looming in less than two years, and with the example of California fresh in mind, expect the fight over expanded voting rights to include pushes for legalized ballot harvesting.

States like Florida and Georgia, which both endured contested elections and lawsuits over absentee ballots last month, can anticipate the push to be tinged with racial undertones. The two states’ respective Democratic gubernatorial candidates, Andrew Gillum and Stacey Abrams, were both also their state’s first African-American nominees, and regularly alleged racial discrimination in any arguments advocating the counting of contested ballots.

(Florida currently allows volunteers to collect ballots, except in Miami-Dade County, which has a localized prohibition against anyone having more than two ballots on their person at once. Georgia prohibits the practice except if the voter is disabled.)

Only 16 states regulate ballot-harvesting at all, and their rules vary.

In Colorado, one of three states to conduct all elections entirely by mail-in ballots, third-party volunteers are allowed to collect up to 10 ballots, though critics have long alleged that the practice is ripe for exploitation.

In November, Montana voters passed a state referendum banning the collection of ballots by third parties. And Arizona’s 2016 ban against the practice, which had previously been linked to voter fraud in the state, was recently upheld by a federal appeals court, despite claims that it would disproportionately impact Latino voters who relied on third parties to help navigate the voting process.

Expect arguments and legal challenges to continue. The first presidential primary ballots will be cast in 14 months.

Eric Eggers directs research at the Government Accountability Institute and is the author of “Fraud: How the Left Plans to Steal the Next Election.”

https://www.realclearinvestigations.com/...r_harvests.html

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#1746768 - 03/26/20 02:00 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: mgh888]
PortlandDawg Offline

Hall of Famer

Registered: 09/11/06
Posts: 5741
Loc: Portland, OR
Originally Posted By: mgh888
https://www.yahoo.com/huffpost/new-york-...-183638991.html

A great read. Something that none of us can really argue with or dismiss... but no doubt the Trump faithful will try.

As for the "suffering" and to put it into perspective - Anne Frank and 7 others hid for 2 years in a 450 sq ft living space. Anyone complaining in today's day and age needs a new perspective on what a challenge is.


I toured the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam. It’s haunting. Her handwriting is still on the walls. Her doodlings too. It’s small. Like really really small. I could only imagine what her and her family endured.
_________________________

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#1746772 - 03/26/20 02:09 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: fishtheice]
PitDAWG Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/10/06
Posts: 39773
Loc: Smyrna, TN.
Originally Posted By: fishtheice

Eric Eggers directs research at the Government Accountability Institute and is the author of “Fraud: How the Left Plans to Steal the Next Election.”


rofl

No agenda there!
_________________________
Sashi Brown was so bad at his job in Cleveland, no other NFL team would even offer him a job. He has been relegated to being in charge of "the culture" of an NBA team. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

#gmstrong

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#1746828 - 03/26/20 07:29 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: PitDAWG]
Versatile Dog Offline

Legend

Registered: 03/03/13
Posts: 44462
Originally Posted By: PitDAWG
j/c

Just a reminder to all of the young people complaining about staying indoors and missing their spring breaks.

People your age had something to look forward to as well from 1964 to 1973. Being drafted and sent to Vietnam.

You think you have to sacrifice? Shut the hell up!


I shared this post w/my family. Even my kids and my daughter's fiance laughed and said......."well, it's true."

Well done, Pit! thumbsup

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#1746843 - 03/26/20 07:55 PM Re: Covid-19 continues. [Re: fishtheice]
Clemdawg Offline

Legend

Registered: 09/22/06
Posts: 11747
Loc: 2 bubbles off of plumb
Quote:
December 13, 2018


Is this posted in support of that Erik Von Whatsizass Breitbart post for a day or two ago?

Game be weak, brah.
Step up, or step off.

insert long yawn here]
_________________________
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